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What to Do With Extra Mandarin Oranges: 5 Creative Jeju Tangerine Recipes & Ideas

Tangerines from Jeju Island are special, thanks to their unique environment, and come in many deliciously sweet and juicy varieties. Besides just eating mandarins as they are, Koreans enjoy their Jeju tangerines in a number of unique ways, from drinking a soothing Tangerine Peel Tea to munching on some airy and crispy Dried Tangerine Chips. 

Here are some creative ways you can enjoy your Jeju tangerines, or any extra mandarin oranges you have at home, using popular Korean tangerine recipes for snacks, drinks and desserts!

Korean Tangerine Peel Tea (귤껍질차)

Tangerine Peel Tea is a widely-loved beverage in South Korea, especially during the cold winter months. Not only does the steaming tea keep you warm from the inside out, it helps to reduce waste by giving use to the peel that would otherwise be thrown out. 

Tangerines are well known to be rich in vitamin C, but did you know that the peel of the tangerine contains 4 times more vitamin C than the pulp? This means that the tea is extra rich in vitamin C, helping to increase immunity and build up resistance to the harsh winter. 

Here’s how to make it:

1. Rinse the peel thoroughly

    Scrub the outer surface of the tangerine peel with baking soda, and place in a small bowl. Add in a mixture of vinegar and water in a 1:10 ratio, and soak the peels for 20 to 30 minutes. Rinse with running water.

    2. Leave to dry

    Once your tangerine peels are clean, leave them to dry out completely for a week. Alternatively, use a food dehydrator to speed up the process.

    3. Brew your tea

    Lightly pan-fry the dried peels on low heat. This will help to deepen its taste and fragrance, but can be skipped if you’d prefer not to undergo the hassle. Boil the dried peels in a pot with some cinnamon, ginger and jujube dates, and serve with some honey for an all-natural sweetness. Enjoy! 

    Tangerine Preserve/Marmalade (귤청)

    In Korea, fruit preserves or marmalades known as 청 (cheong) are a popular condiment for locals to make with their fruits. Tangerine marmalades are similar to tangerine jams, and are rich in vitamin C. These Korean tangerine preserves can be mixed with hot water to make a steaming cup of tangerine tea, together with carbonated soda water to make tangerine soda, or spread over toast to spice up your breakfast. 

    The process of making tangerine marmalade includes a considerable amount of time for the preserving process, but it’s so easy and delicious that it’s worth the wait!

    Here’s how to make it:

    1. Rinse, peel & slice your tangerines

    Give your tangerines a good wash, then peel them well. Slice the mandarin oranges lengthwise, so that they make round discs of your preferred thickness. Alternatively, cut the tangerines in whichever shape you prefer.

    2. Add sugar

    Place the tangerines in a glass jar, alternating layers of tangerine slices with sprinkles of sugar. Alternatively, you can also place all your tangerine slices in a large mixing bowl and mix them thoroughly with sugar in a 1:1 ratio, before placing them into the jar. The first option has a more aesthetically pleasing finish, but the latter is easier and quicker.

    3. Bring extra flavour with tangerine juice

    If you have any extra tangerines, or less presentably-cut slices that you’re leaving out of the jar, be sure to squeeze and strain them. Add the juice into the jar to preserve along with the rest of the marmalade for extra flavour. 

    4. Leave it to sit, then store in the fridge

    For an extra finish, sprinkle a little more sugar over the top few tangerines, and close the jar tight. Let it sit in a cool, room temperature area for 2-3 days, opening the jar once to mix the tangerines and sugar well. Afterwards, refrigerate and enjoy your tangerine marmalade as a drink, or with some toasted bread!

    Dried Mandarin Orange Chips

    Who doesn’t love a good snack? While fresh tangerines are delicious and juicy, they can get messy, which may not be ideal snacking material for lazy couch days or while doing work. Dried tangerine chips are an innovative Korean snack, and are as easy to make as they are to eat.

    To make these, you can simply sun-dry tangerine slices over a period of time. If you can’t stand the wait, the microwave will do the trick too!

    Here’s how to make it:

    1. Wash & slice your tangerines

    Wash your tangerines by scrubbing the outer surface with baking soda, then rinsing it thoroughly. Keep the peel on and slice your tangerines lengthwise, as thinly as possible. Remember, thinner slices mean crisper and lighter chips!

    2. Microwave your tangerine slices

    Place your tangerine slices flat on a tray or plate, and sprinkle with sugar. Microwave them for 30 seconds, then take them out to pat dry with paper towels. Repeat around 3 to 4 times, and they’re ready to eat!

    Tangerine Latte

    This one’s a unique one - Tangerine Latte! It may sound like a confusing combination of flavours, but the sweetness of the tangerines blend well with the velvety milk to work just as well as chocolate oranges do. It’s also the easiest recipe ever, and can be prepared in just 5 minutes.

    Here’s how to make it:

    1. Microwave milk

    Place 300ml of milk in the microwave for 5 minutes to warm it up. 

    2. Construct tangerine latte

    Slice a tangerine lengthwise into about 3 to 5 slices, and place them into your mug. Pour the warm milk over, and top with some milk foam if you have an electric mixer or milk foamer. A perfect non-caffeinated fix for rainy days or early mornings!

    Tangerine Sorbet

    More often than not, Singapore’s sweltering weather can get the best of us. This quick and easy tangerine sorbet will not only help cool you down, but is also homemade, allowing you to benefit from all the vitamin C goodness without worrying about preservatives.

    Here’s how to make it:

    1. Prepare sugar syrup

    Wash your tangerines well, scrubbing the peels with baking soda and rinsing them thoroughly. Peel the tangerine, then simmer the rinds with 300ml of water and 100g of caster sugar in a saucepan, until the sugar dissolves fully.

    2. Create sorbet mixture

    Remove your syrup from the heat and allow it to cool completely. Discard the tangerine peels, and mix in 300ml of tangerine juice. 

    3. Start freezing

    Pour your sorbet mixture into a shallow tray or plate, placing it into the freezer to solidify. When the liquid is frozen, break it into small chunks and blend in a food processor. Place the icy mixture back into the tray and return it to the freezer. Repeat this process once more to achieve a smooth texture, then freeze it until it’s completely firm. 

    4. Serve

    Transfer your sorbet to the refrigerator 15 minutes before serving to allow it to soften slightly. Scoop it into a bowl and enjoy!

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    Those were some simple tangerine recipes to put a creative spin on your Jeju mandarin oranges, from snacks to desserts. While eating mandarins are delicious on their own, spend a little extra time to enhance the flavours of your Jeju tangerines and enjoy them in a variety of different ways!

    Various Jeju Tangerines are now available for purchase at BlueBasket! Enjoy fresh tangerines flown direct from Korea, in the comfort of your home in Singapore.



    Read More: Jeju Tangerines: What Makes Them Special?

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